Calf GroFacts

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Grain-Fed Veal – Producer Objectives

Why Higher Protein?

Capitalize on the rapid early growth potential of young calves. Meet the needs of the rapidly growing bone and muscle for protein. This encourages greater lean tissue deposition without excess fattening.

Why Specific Protein : Fat Ratio?

Provide the correct protein to fat ratio at these higher feeding rates, to better promote muscle and skeletal growth so that increases in stature are attained. The high digestibility of lactose and the requirement for energy by the calf must… Continue reading

Developmental Research – Grain-fed Veal Programs

Ontario and Quebec dairy herds produce approximately 400,000 male calves annually. These calves are destined for several hundred veal producers.The goal of grain fed veal producers is to achieve the desired finish at the desired weight and age. The market-ready calf is typically 250-295kg at an age of 25-30 weeks. Finished average daily gains should be 1.13kg or better and feed conversion should be 3.5-4.0 kg per kg of live-weight gain.

The Holstein calf has an ability to grow rapidly… Continue reading

Program Summary Grober VG 21/19

Product Profile

A specifically formulated calf milk replacer for excellence in raising GRAIN VEAL CALVES.

The Need

Young Holstein bull calves require a quality milk replacer to ensure a healthy start. Young calves that have been transported are severally energy deficient and under stress. The best way to counteract these conditions is to provide a dry clean environment and offer a quality milk replacer that will provide the necessary protein and fat to allow the calf to establish itself and… Continue reading

Enhanced Feeding Producer Objectives

Why High Protein?

Capitalize on the rapid early growth potential of young calves. Meet the needs of the rapidly growing bone and muscle for protein. This encourages greater lean tissue deposition and thus stature without excess fattening.

Why Specific Protein:Fat Ratio?

Provide the correct protein to fat ratio at these higher feeding rates, to better promote muscle and skeletal growth so that increases in stature are attained. The high digestibility of lactose and the requirement for energy by the calf… Continue reading

Developmental Research – enhanced feeding programs

Numerous studies, back as far as 1968, have examined the effects of feeding increased rates of milk or milk replacer to young calves. Recent developments in this area of heifer rearing have led to enhanced feeding programs.

Conventional calf feeding offers milk replacer, of 18-22% protein and 15-22% fat, at approximately 500g/d. This can support approx. 400g/d live-weight gain (LWG). For dairy replacement heifers of high genetic potential, this is not sufficient to meet optimum growth potential. Recent studies have… Continue reading

Program Summary Grober Excel

Product Profile

A specifically formulated high protein milk replacer for excellence in raising heifer calves.

The Need

Intensive feeding programs have been a major topic for discussion and presentation over the last year. Their aim has been to maximize genetic growth potential, get heifers to breeding weight sooner and also maximize lean tissue growth (height and weight).

A young animal can not be limit fed protein and energy and be successful or efficient in depositing protein as lean tissue growth.… Continue reading

Calf-Energy Balance and Immune Competence

Calves reared for veal are usually transported from the dairy farm to the rearing unit during the first 2 weeks of life. The vigour of calves after arrival at the rearing unit is dependent on:

  • Their vitality before leaving the dairy farm (colostrum quality and quantity, timing and hygiene)
  • Duration and nature of the transfer (climatic stresses, deprivation of milk and water, handling, noise)
  • Changes in environmental conditions (mixing calves, high infection risk, change in housing system, climate, feeding level… Continue reading

Typical Grain Veal Growth

The aim of beef production is to produce a high quality product with maximum efficiency.

Factors that affect the carcass composition and carcass yield are:

  • Weight and age
  • Genotype
  • Gender
  • Growth rate and nutrition
  • Conformation

A typical growth curve involves a self-accelerating phase of weight increase from birth to puberty of the animal. During this phase, growth hormones are mainly responsible for the growth process. The second phase of growth (puberty to adulthood) has lower rates of weight increase and… Continue reading

Heifer-Mammary Development

It is important to remember that the foundations of udder development are completed within the first 15 months of life. Mammary growth and development is a component of the reproductive process and is affected by hormonal changes that occur as the animal develops.

The basic structures of the mammary gland (teats, circulatory system, mammary fat pad and ligaments) are established at birth.

From birth to approximately 3 months, the mammary gland grows at roughly the same rate as the… Continue reading

Heifer Holstein Size Targets

The profit-making potential of the modern cow depends on her ability to combine production and type. Functional type enables a cow to produce over a long lifetime. (Holstein Canada)

Relative Emphasis for Cows

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Body weight alone should not be a measure for developmental traits of heifers. Wither height is also any important measurement of skeletal development (frame and capacity). If heifers are not grown properly and do not achieve sufficient size at calving, they will not be able to take… Continue reading

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